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Urgent and Available Cases

NIJC's network of pro bono attorneys represent asylum seekers, unaccompanied immigrant children, survivors of domestic abuse and low-income individuals applying for naturalization. NIJC screens all cases to ensure individuals are eligible for relief and to prioritize individuals and families who lack the private resources needed to obtain representation elsewhere.

NIJC pro bono attorneys receive training before taking on their first case, and ongoing technical assistance and case support as necessary throughout the life of each case.

*URGENT* Help a young Honduran mother and son apply for asylum by 10/09/19.

F. speaks Spanish and lives in Indianapolis, Indiana.

L.'s father abused her from a young age; he was violent with her siblings, mother and son. L.’s ex-partner, and father of her son, threatened L. with harm and death after she left him.  He is a member of an armed vigilante group that purports to fight the gangs in Honduras. Fearing further abuse from her father and ex-partner, L. fled to the United States.  USCIS must receive L.’s skeletal application for asylum, with K. included as a derivative, by October 9, 2019.  All affidavits and supporting materials to L.’s case will be due one week prior to her interview at the asylum office, which will likely occur 4-6 weeks after filing.

Special Immigrant Juvenile: 13 year-old Mexican boy seeks legal stability.

A. has not had a relationship with his father in many years and was raised primarily by his mother.  A. came to the United States in November 2015. He was apprehended and detained in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, and eventually released to his mother’s care. Although A.’s father’s name is not on A.’s birth certificate, A.’s mother believes his father would sign an acknowledgement of paternity. The pro bono attorney will need to file a custody case on behalf of A’.s mother, and obtain an order finding that A.’s reunification with his father is not viable due to abandonment and/or neglect, and that it is not in A.’s best interest to return to Mexico.

URGENT Asylum: A man from Pakistan, detained in San Diego, CA.

I. speaks Urdu and is a plaintiff in Asylum Ban litigation

I. grew up practicing Sunni Islam, the dominant religion of Pakistan, but converted to Shia Islam a few years ago. After converting, I. started receiving threats and was brutally attacked. After a particularly brutal attack that sent I. to the hospital, the police refused to help him saying that I. should just stop being Shia. I. fled Pakistan and entered the United States on July 24, 2019. He was apprehended and detained soon after entry. I. is currently a plaintiff in a class action lawsuit against the “Asylum Ban 2.0.”  I. is currently detained in San Diego and will seek asylum as a defense to deportation.

“NIJC’s legal work has allowed me to see families reunited, men and women fleeing terrible persecution find a new home through asylum, and victims of abuse given the dignity and security of legal status and the authorization to work.”
Sara Ghadiri, Chapman & Cutler LLP
 

Pro Bono Spotlight

Thanks to the support of more than 1,500 pro bono attorneys from the nation's leading law firms, NIJC has made critical advances in the lives of hundreds of thousands of vulnerable immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers. NIJC provides legal services to more than 10,000 individuals each year and maintains a success rate of 90 percent in obtaining asylum for those fleeing persecution in their home countries.

 

Events

NIJC offers a wide range of immigration law trainings and other opportunities for attorneys to engage with the organization's mission. An attorney taking a case for the first time must attend one of NIJC's quarterly trainings.

 

Federal Litigation

NIJC and its pro bono attorneys are on the vanguard of federal impact litigation and advocacy, setting positive precedents for people seeking human rights protections within the United States and defending against the administration's efforts to undermine access to due process.